By Marty Bodnar [click to continue…]

{ 0 comments }

By Jeremy Kennedy [click to continue…]

{ 0 comments }

By Tom Daniels [click to continue…]

{ 0 comments }

By Wendy Alton [click to continue…]

{ 0 comments }

Ann Arbor, MI – Wendy Alton was recently contacted by Patrick Clarke of ABC News to provide commentary on proposed Senate Bill 896, currently being processed through the Michigan Legislature. She was quoted in his article, “Michigan May Repeal Old Law Against Unmarried Living Together” on May 11, 2016. The article can be accessed at http://abcnews.go.com/US/michigan-repeal-law-unmarried-living/story?id=39038780.

Wendy, an experienced and talented trial lawyer, currently focuses her practice on family law, estate planning and probate. Wendy is an expert in the areas of divorce, custody and support, and is certified as a divorce and custody mediator. Wendy was named to the Michigan Super Lawyers “Rising Star” list in 2012 and 2013.

Wendy is based in the firm’s Ann Arbor office at 24 Frank Lloyd Wright Dr., Ann Arbor, MI 48105 and can be reached at (734) 665-4441 or via email at walton@psedlaw.com

 

**********
Marketing & Communication Contacts:

Wendy Alton
Jeremy Kennedy
Domino’s Farms, Lobby D
24 Frank Lloyd Wright Drive, Suite D-2000
Ann Arbor, MI 48105
734) 665-4441

 

{ 0 comments }

by Wendy Alton [click to continue…]

{ 0 comments }

By Wendy Alton – According to a recent study, divorced parents contribute a significant amount less toward college for their children than parents that remain married. The study was discussed in a Washington Post article, and revealed that divorced parents spend nearly 1/3 less on college expenses than married parents. Obviously this is a huge difference and disadvantage to children of divorce. What can you do as a divorced parent to ensure that college expenses remain a priority?

First, to clarify, Michigan does not require a divorcing couple to have an agreement about college tuition or expenses. In fact, Michigan courts can only make decisions about your child until the child is 18 or graduates from high school, whichever is later. Thus, college expenses are frequently not addressed in a divorce, especially when the children of the divorcing couple are very young.
However, there are a number of things you can include in your divorce to help pay for college expenses. Of course you and your spouse will have to agree, because absent an agreement, the court will not force you to do it. Some ideas are as follows:

  • You can agree as parents to equally share the college expenses incurred by your children, or share them on a percentage basis.
  • You can agree to each contribute to a college fund that is held in trust for the children.
  • You can formulate an agreement that has one parent paying tuition costs, while the other parent pays books, boarding, etc.

What is especially important, though, in formulating such an agreement to pay college expenses, is to define what college expenses will be paid, particularly:

  • Will you pay for in-state or out-of-state tuition?
  • Will you only pay if their grade point remains passing or above a certain grade?
  • Will you require the student to obtain loans/grants/scholarships first?
  • Is this for undergraduate only or post-graduate work?

The lesson is that if college for your children is important to you as you are divorcing, try to work out an agreement with your spouse to make it a priority. Be careful to negotiate exactly what each parent is prepared to provide, and what expectations are required. Also, you must have an attorney review such an agreement. Once the agreement has been signed, absent a mutual agreement to change it, the agreement is binding and cannot be changed regardless of any changes in your financial condition.

If you are interested in learning more, please call Wendy Alton at 734-665-4441 or email her at walton@psedlaw.com.

{ 0 comments }

By Wendy Alton – In the state of Michigan, you can end your marriage by filing for one of three things: divorce, separate maintenance (legal separation), or annulment. An annulment is only granted if the marriage itself was void from the beginning or the marriage is voidable.

A void marriage in Michigan is a marriage that could not have taken place legally from the beginning. What this means is that there was consanguinity, affinity, bigamy, minority, incapacity or incompetency. In simple, plain English, this means the following:

  • Consanguinity: you married a blood relative prohibited by law.
  • Affinity: you married a blood relative of your spouse prohibited by law.
  • Bigamy: you married someone who was already married.
  • Minority: you or your spouse is under the age of 16, or between 16 and 18 and you didn’t get a parent’s consent.
  • Incapacity & Incompetency: you or your spouse has a mental illness or is mentally incompetent to the degree that you or your spouse cannot enter into a contract.

Marriages that are void as a matter of law (examples above) can be ended with an annulment.

Voidable marriages in Michigan mean marriages that can be voided for fraud, duress, sterility and impotence. Sterility and impotence must be incurable. In order to have your marriage annulled for these reasons, you must file for an annulment within two years of the marriage. Examples of fraud and duress are as follows:

  • You marry someone to obtain a green card (for immigration purposes only).
  • A person is induced to marry because they are told that a child is biologically theirs, and this turns out not to be true.
  • You marry under the influence of drugs or alcohol.
  • You marry someone who is barren or sterile and they do not tell you.
  • You marry because you are threatened. (duress)

The grounds for a voidable marriage must be proven with clear and convincing evidence in order to obtain an annulment.

There are, however, defenses to annulment. This is particularly so if the spouse finds out about any of the reasons above and still lives with the other person even after finding out. Cohabitation is a defense, and can overcome any request for an annulment based upon voidable grounds.

If you are interested in learning more, please call Wendy Alton at 734-665-4441 or email her at walton@psedlaw.com

{ 0 comments }

We often think that custody battles involve just children. However, pets are often cherished members of the family, and how divorcing couples share time with their pets is often of primary focus and concern. It is not uncommon to hear the following: “My dog is my baby.”

Despite the close loving relationship we have with our family pets, they are considered personal property in Michigan—which means that a divorcing couple must come to an agreement on who is going to take the pets. Sometimes this is easily resolved, because in some marriages only one spouse is emotionally attached to the pet and wants it. But what happens when both people want Fido? How can you resolve that sort of situation?

In one of my former cases, we wrote a specific agreement into the Divorce Judgment regarding the dog. One person took custody of the dog, but the other person had the option of monthly visits with the dog, and was entitled to advance notice if the dog fell ill or needed to be put to sleep. The upside of this: the person who didn’t take the dog had a chance to continue visits with the dog. The downside of this: in a divorce with no children, the couple continued to be connected after divorce. (yes, for most people this is a downside).

In another of my former cases, the dog was actually awarded to the minor children, and the dog travelled back and forth with the children to mom and dad’s house. The expenses for the dog and any vet bills were to be shared equally between the mom and dad. There didn’t appear to be any downside to this type of arrangement.

While those are merely two examples of how to handle a divorce dispute about a family pet, there are dozens of potential solutions, and particularly a solution that caters to your particular situation.

Lesson to be learned? If you are going through a divorce and have a pet, be sure to tell your attorney. If your attorney doesn’t ask and you don’t let them know in advance, this can potentially hinder a successful settlement because it will be a surprise issue in the end.

If you are interested in learning more, please call Wendy Alton at 734-665-4441 or email her at walton@psedlaw.com.

{ 0 comments }

One common question that is often asked is whether or not Michigan has what is called a “legal separation,” allowing a married couple to legally separate, but still remain married.

The simple answer is yes, but the procedure is not so simple. Michigan has a legal action entitled “Separate Maintenance.” An action for “Separate Maintenance” is filed with the court just as a Divorce action is filed. The process for a Separate Maintenance action is identical to that of a Divorce. In a Separate Maintenance action, just as in a Divorce action, the couple must decide on how they are going to distribute their assets, share their debt, determine child support & spousal support, and also address how assets are purchased and debt is acquired in the future.

At the end of a Separate Maintenance action, a Judgment of Separate Maintenance is entered with the Court, and the couple is officially legally separated, meaning that all property and debt has been divided, but the couple is still legally married.

Why would a couple proceed with a Separate Maintenance action instead of a Divorce? The most common reasons are religious and medical. Some people opt for a Separate
Maintenance action because divorce is frowned upon or prohibited in their religion. Some people truly need the medical insurance of their spouse and cannot obtain insurance on their own. For these people, they essentially become “divorced” but still remain married. However, whether or not this is possible depends solely on the medical insurance provider, and whether or not they will continue coverage even if the couple is separated with a Judgment of Separate Maintenance.

What happens if you go through the entire Separate Maintenance action and then decide later that you want to become divorced? You have to file a Divorce action with the court and start from the beginning again.

Separate Maintenance actions are not very common in Michigan, but it is the only legal avenue in Michigan that allows a couple to split all assets, share all debt, live independently, but still remain married. It is the only way for a couple to become legally separated.

If you are interested in learning more, please call Wendy Alton at 734-665-4441 or email her at walton@psedlaw.com.

{ 0 comments }

By Wendy Alton

A common misperception of people going through a divorce in Michigan is that spousal support (formerly called alimony) is based solely or mostly upon a difference in income between the spouses. While it is true that the court considers income when deciding if spousal support should be awarded—income is just 1 of 14 factors that the courts review.

In deciding whether or not spousal support should be awarded, the court must review the following factors before a decision is made, Berger v Berger 277 Mich App 700, 726-7 (2008):

1. The past relations and conduct of both spouses
2. The length of the marriage
3. The ability of both spouses to work
4. The source and amount of property awarded to each spouse
5. The spouses’ respective ages
6. The ability of both spouses to pay spousal support
7. The present situation of each spouse
8. The needs of each spouse
9. The health of each spouse
10. The prior standard of living of the couple and whether either is responsible for the support of others
11. Contributions of the spouses respectively to joint marital property
12. A spouse’s fault in causing the divorce
13. The effect of cohabitation on the spouse’s financial status
14. General principles of equity.

There are no hard and fast rules for determining if spousal support should be awarded, how much should be awarded and for how long. Each case is reviewed independently and separately to determine the answer to these questions.

If you are interested in learning more, please call Wendy Alton at 734-665-4441 or email her at walton@psedlaw.com.

{ 0 comments }

By Wendy Alton

You are engaged to be married, and have either bought or received a beautiful (expensive) engagement ring. Unfortunately, something happens to destroy the pre-wedding bliss and the wedding is called off for good. If the marriage never happens, who gets the engagement ring?

The courts in Michigan have answered unequivocally: the person who gave the ring in anticipation of the marriage.

The definitive case on this issue is Meyer v Mitnick, 244 Mich App 697 (2001). In that case, Dr. Barry Meyer purchased a custom-designed engagement ring for his finance’ Robyn Mitnick at the cost of $19,500. Prior to the marriage, Dr. Meyer asked Ms. Mitnick to sign a prenuptial agreement, and Ms. Mitnick refused. The marriage was called off.

Ms. Mitnick refused to return the engagement ring, so Dr. Meyer sued her for its return. Dr. Meyer argued that the engagement ring was a conditional gift, given in anticipation of marriage, and since the marriage wasn’t going to happen, the gift should be returned. Ms. Mitnick argued that Dr. Meyer broke the engagement, and thus was at fault for the marriage not occurring, and that based upon fault, she should be allowed to keep the ring.

The trial court, Oakland County Circuit Court, ruled that the ring should be returned to Dr. Meyer because it is a conditional gift, and that issues of fault do not determine who keeps the ring. Ms. Mitnick appealed that decision to the Michigan Court of Appeals.

The Michigan Court of Appeals affirmed the trial court’s decision. They concluded the following:

“In sum, we hold that an engagement ring given in contemplation of marriage is an impliedly conditional gift that is a completed gift only upon marriage. If the engagement is called off, for whatever reasons, the gift is not capable of becoming a completed gift and must be returned to the donor.”

Long story short, if the marriage doesn’t happen, the ring is given back to the person that gave it in anticipation of the marriage.

Keep in mind, however, that two people can always come to a written agreement otherwise. If there is a written agreement that the person receiving the engagement ring can keep it regardless of what happens, that agreement would usually govern.

Also keep in mind that once the couple is married, the condition is fulfilled, and the engagement ring, once a conditional gift, is now an outright gift and belongs solely to the person receiving it.

If you are interested in learning more, please call Wendy Alton at 734-665-4441 or email her at walton@psedlaw.com.

{ 0 comments }

By Wendy Alton

It seems like one of the biggest mysteries with family law clients is how child support is actually calculated. It is a common misperception that child support is based just on the income of both parents. While income is a factor, it is not the only consideration when child support is calculated.

In Michigan, the following is a standard list of items considered to calculate child support:

  1. Income. Each parent’s income is considered, which includes wages, overtime, commissions, bonuses, self-employment income, contract income, investment earnings, social security, unemployment, disability, worker’s compensation, retirement income, military pay, tips, gambling earnings, alimony (spousal support), and employment perks, just to name a few.
  1. Deductions from Income. Income is reduced by deductions, including but not limited to actual taxes paid, mandatory payments withheld as a condition of employment (like union dues), life insurance premiums if the children are beneficiaries, employer contributions to pension plans, and spousal support paid to someone other than the other parent
  1. Number of Children. This is the number of children of this particular marriage.
  1. Second Family Adjustment. There is an allowable deduction for other biological children of each parent.
  1. Tax Filing Status. It must be specified how each parent is filing taxes: single, head of household, married filing jointly, or married filing separately.
  1. Tax Exemptions. Child support considers how many tax exemptions each parent has, and how many of those exemptions are for children under the age of 17.
  1. Child Care. The monthly child care amount (and for how many children) must be specified for each parent.
  1. Health Insurance Premiums. The monthly amount that each parent pays for health care insurance premiums for the children is considered. (premiums only—not out of pocket expenses)
  1. Parenting Time Schedule. Child Support considers the number of overnights each parent has with each child.

All of the above factors are considered, and each factor is plugged into a computer program that provides an initial child support recommendation. The courts use this computer program, and many family law attorneys (like our office) have programs that are similar to the court’s program.

While the list above sets forward the general factors used in computing child support, keep in mind that there are situations that can exist that justify a “deviation” from the recommendation. This can occur, for example, when one parent is voluntarily unemployed or underemployed, when a child has special needs, if the parent is a minor, or if a parent is incarcerated, to name a few, or other situations that a court determines relevant.

Each case has its own special facts and situations that must be considered in order to properly calculate child support. Income alone is not the determining factor for how child support is calculated. If you are currently paying or receiving child support and are unclear as to how your child support was calculated, you should contact a family law attorney to have your child support reviewed and analyzed. This is one of the most frequent services that we offer our own clients.

If you are interested in learning more, please call Wendy Alton at 734-665-4441 or email her at walton@psedlaw.com

{ 0 comments }

By Wendy Alton

Common law marriage is the term for a “marriage” that exists solely by agreement and by cohabitation. More simply, a common-law marriage exists when two people agree to live together to be “married.” Common-law marriage is one of the fundamental rights that has existed in this country since the first settlers.

In 1838, Michigan passed a law that stated that “marriages may be solemnized by any justice of the peace in the county in which he is chosen, and they may be solemnized throughout the state by any minister of the gospel who has been ordained.” This was the first law enacted in Michigan in order to move away from the recognition of common-law marriage. The law was formalized in order to try to require either a justice of the peace or a minister to “solemnize” a marriage.

However, the law didn’t stick. In 1877, the United States Supreme Court heard the case of Meister v Moore. This was a case about the validity of a common-law marriage between William Mowry and his wife, Mary, the daughter of a Native-American named Pero. William Mowry had cohabitated with Mary for seven years, and then passed away. They had one daughter together, and if they were actually married under Michigan law, any property William owned would eventually pass to his daughter. If William wasn’t married under Michigan law, then any property he owned would pass to his mother.

The United States Supreme Court ruled that Michigan’s law of 1838 did not require that marriages be validated by a justice of a peace or a minister, but instead stated such solemnization (authorization) was discretionary: “marriages may be solemnized.” Thus, the common-law marriage of William and Mary was valid, and their daughter would eventually inherit any land that William owned.

It appears that Michigan did not address this issue again until January 1, 1957, when it changed its law to require that marriages must result only from a marriage license. After January 1, 1957, mere consent to be married or cohabitation would not be enough. A couple wanting to marry and have their marriage recognized by Michigan law would have to apply for and receive a marriage license. After the marriage license was issued, the marriage would then have to be authorized by a judge, a mayor, a court clerk or a minister.

Long story short, in Michigan, unless you have lived with someone with the agreement that you are married since December 31, 1956, Michigan will not acknowledge your common-law marriage. In order to be married, you must apply for a marriage license and then have your marriage solemnized or authorized by persons specified by Michigan law. This also means that in Michigan, in order to receive all the benefits that a spouse receives (health care, property, and inheritance); just living together is not enough.

If you are interested in learning more, please call Wendy Alton at 734-665-4441 or email her at walton@psedlaw.com.

{ 0 comments }

Contact: Ed Pear
Tel: 734-645-4441
Email: epear@psedlaw.com

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday, October 20, 2015

PEAR SPERLING EGGAN & DANIELS P.C. WELCOMES MARTY BODNAR

The law firm of Pear Sperling Eggan & Daniels P.C. announced today that Marty Bodnar, a former U-M Associate Athletic Director, and former Wolverine basketball player, has agreed to join the firm. Bodnar will concentrate his practice in the areas of estate planning and elder, business and real estate law.

“We are delighted that Marty is joining our firm,” said Managing Partner Ed Pear.  “He brings extensive experience from a high profile position that required objectivity and quiet diplomacy while meeting the needs of alumni, donors, students and other stakeholders. That experience combined with his financial planning background and many years spent in private legal practice and as an elected official and prosecutor are credentials you simply cannot manufacture.”

Bodnar returns to the practice of law after working for Exchange Capital as an investment advisor, passing the Certified Financial Planning exam in 2011. His primary areas of focus are estate planning and elder law, business and real estate law. His financial planning background helps him plan estates while understanding his clients’ overall financial picture; his MBA helps him advise businesses with an appreciation for each client’s overall business challenges.

Bodnar practiced law in Ohio for 14 years both in the public sector and private practice. He served as the elected Law Director for the City of Barberton, Ohio and Chief Prosecutor of the Barberton Municipal Court. He maintained a private practice focusing on estate, business and tax planning, probate and trust administration, real estate, bankruptcy, Medicaid Planning and non-profit formation. Prior to his time at Exchange Capital, Bodnar served 12 years as Associate Athletic Director at the University of Michigan, directing ticket sales and marketing of U-M‘s varsity sports programs.

A graduate of the University of Michigan, Bodnar received his bachelor’s degree in economics and was a three-year starter on the basketball team, serving as a co-captain in his junior year. Following graduation from the University of Michigan, Bodnar received his Juris Doctorate from the University of Akron and his Master’s in Business Administration from Eastern Michigan University.

Bodnar resides in Pittsfield Township with his wife Renee of 28 years and has two married children, Rachel and Jacob. He will be based in our Ann Arbor office at 24 Frank Lloyd Wright Drive. He can be reached at 734-665-4441 or via email at mbodnar@psedlaw.com.

{ 0 comments }

PSED is proud to announce that Jerry Lax has once again been named to The Best Lawyers in America list, one of the most highly regarded and widely recognized annual attorney rankings in the country. The Best Lawyers list for 2016 was released to the public on August 17th, recognizing Jerry as one of The Best Lawyers in America in the following 7 practice areas: Employment Law for Individuals and Businesses; Land Use & Zoning Law; Municipal Law; and, Litigation for land use, employment, and municipal disputes.

2016 marks the 22nd year that the Best Lawyers in America list has been compiled and published. The selection process for the list is based on an exhaustive peer-review that seeks meaningful and substantive evaluations of an attorney’s experience and work. Jerry has been on the list, in a variety of practice areas, every year since 2007.

Jerry is based in PSED’s Ann Arbor office at 24 Frank Lloyd Wright Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48105, and can be reached at (734) 821-1046, or via email at jlax@psedlaw.com

**********
Marketing & Communication Contacts:

Jeremy Kennedy, Esq.
Domino’s Farms, Lobby D
24 Frank Lloyd Wright Drive
Ann Arbor, MI 48105
Wendy Alton
Associate Attorney
Domino’s Farms, Lobby D
24 Frank Lloyd Wright Drive
Ann Arbor, MI 48105
{ 0 comments }

April 26, 2015

Wendy Alton CommencementDearborn, MI – Wendy Alton spoke at the University of Michigan-Dearborn 2015 commencement ceremony for the College of Arts, Sciences & Letters. Wendy, an alumna of the University of Michigan-Dearborn, was invited to address this year’s graduating class regarding the importance and value of mentorship. Wendy spoke alongside Michael Brown (keynote address), Benita Robinson (student address), and Professor Jorge Gonzalez del Pozo (faculty address).

Wendy graduated from the University of Michigan-Dearborn in 1998 with a BA in English and a double-minor in History and Physics. She previously served as a member of the Board of Governors for the College of Arts, Sciences & Letters Alumni Affiliate.

Wendy, an experienced and talented trial lawyer, currently focuses her practice on family law, estate planning and probate estate settlement. Wendy is an expert in the areas of divorce, custody, support, and prenuptial agreements, and is certified as a divorce and custody mediator. Wendy was named to the Michigan Super Lawyers “Rising Star” list in 2012 and 2013.

Wendy is based in the firm’s Ann Arbor office at 24 Frank Lloyd Wright Dr., Ann Arbor, MI 48105 and can be reached at (734) 665-4441 or via email at walton@psedlaw.com

***********

Marketing & Communications Contacts:

Jeremy Kennedy, Esq.
Domino’s Farms, Lobby D
24 Frank Lloyd Wright Drive
Ann Arbor, MI 48105
(734) 655-4441
Wendy Alton, Esq.
Domino’s Farms, Lobby D
24 Frank Lloyd Wright Drive
Ann Arbor, MI 48105
(734) 665-4441
{ 0 comments }

January 29, 2015

Novi, MI – Thomas Daniels presented “Overview of Recent Michigan Supreme Court and Court of Appeals Decisions of Significance to Local Government Management,” at the Michigan Local Government Management Association’s (MLGMA) Winter Institute. The MLGMA’s annual Winter Institute gives MLGMA members the opportunity to network, share ideas, and learn about topics that are relevant to municipal administration.

Tom is a principal/owner of PSED Law, and the firm’s chief litigator. He is engaged in a broad civil-trial practice, with an emphasis on municipal law. Tom’s major municipal client is a regional water distribution and wastewater treatment authority, for which he has served as general, litigation, and environmental enforcement counsel since 1998. Tom also works as coverage and coverage-litigation counsel to the Michigan Municipal Liability and Property Pool, a major municipal insurance pool. In 2012, 2013, and 2014, Tom was recognized as a Michigan Super Lawyer in the area of General/Commercial litigation.

Tom is based out of the firm’s Ypsilanti Office, 1349 South Huron St., Suite 1, Ypsilanti, MI 48197, and can be reached at tdaniels@psedlaw.com, or 734-483-3626.

***********
Marketing & Communications Contacts:

Jeremy Kennedy, Esq.
Domino’s Farms, Lobby D
24 Frank Lloyd Wright Drive
Ann Arbor, MI 48105
Wendy Alton, Esq.
Domino’s Farms, Lobby D
24 Frank Lloyd Wright Drive
Ann Arbor, MI 48105
{ 0 comments }

Ann Arbor, MIPear Sperling Eggan & Daniels, P.C., is excited to announce the addition of Joseph M. West to the firm’s Ann Arbor office. Joe, who is currently in his ninth year of practice, specializes in commercial litigation at both the trial and appellate levels, business law, and a broad range of issues relating to real property.

In 2006, Joe graduated first in his law school class from Wayne State University, obtaining summa cum laude distinction, and admission into the Order of the Coif. Thereafter, Joe completed a prestigious judicial clerkship to the Honorable Ronald L. Gilman of the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit.

Prior to joining PSED Law Joe spent three years working for a 350+ lawyer firm headquartered in Detroit. For the past five years Joe has enjoyed tremendous success managing his own firm in Ann Arbor. Joe has been named to Michigan Super lawyers “Rising Stars” each year since 2009.

Joe lives in Washtenaw County with his wife and three children.

Joe is based in PSED Law’s Ann Arbor office at 24 Frank Lloyd Wright Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48105, and can be reached at (734) 665-4441, or via email at jwest@psedlaw.com.

Pear Sperling Eggan & Daniels, P.C., is one of the oldest and most respected law firms in Washtenaw County. For more information please visit our website at psedlaw.com, or inquire by phone at (734) 665-4441.

***********

Marketing & Communications Contacts:

Jeremy Kennedy, Esq.
Domino’s Farms, Lobby D
24 Frank Lloyd Wright Drive
Ann Arbor, MI 48105
(734) 655-4441
Wendy Alton, Esq.
Domino’s Farms, Lobby D
24 Frank Lloyd Wright Drive
Ann Arbor, MI 48105
(734) 655-4441
{ 0 comments }

PSED Law is proud to announce that Jerry Lax has been named to The Best Lawyers list, one of the oldest and most respected annual attorney rankings in the country. The Best Lawyers list was released on November 3, 2014, and recognizes Jerry for his outstanding work in the following practice areas: employment law for both individuals, and businesses; land use and zoning law; and litigation. Jerry has been recognized by The Best Lawyers every year since 2007. The selection process for The Best Lawyers is based on an exhaustive peer-review that seeks meaningful and substantive evaluations of an attorney’s experience and work.

Jerry is currently in his 48th year of practice. After obtaining degrees from the University of Michigan and Harvard Law School, Jerry served as a law clerk on the United State Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit. He is a longtime Ann Arbor resident, and worked as Ann Arbor City Attorney before going into private practice in 1973. Jerry has been with Pear Sperling Eggan & Daniels since 2011, and his practice is currently focused on municipal law, land use and zoning, employment law, and commercial litigation.

Jerry is based in PSED Law’s Ann Arbor office at 24 Frank Lloyd Wright Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48105, and can be reached at (734) 665-4441, or via email at jlax@psedlaw.com.

***********

Marketing & Communications Contacts:

Matt Daniels
Associate Attorney
1349 S. Huron St., Suite 1
Ypsilanti, MI 48197
Wendy Alton
Associate Attorney
Domino’s Farms, Lobby D
24 Frank Lloyd Wright Drive
Ann Arbor, MI 48105
{ 0 comments }